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review writing

review writing

Review writing
The following reviews are too brief to tell readers what’s good about the company. They also don’t provide much useful feedback to help the business improve:
Trustpilot is a platform that companies can access for free. Reviews are public, but that doesn’t guarantee that the reviewed company will see your feedback. If you have an urgent problem, you should contact the company directly.

Support your judgments with quotations or descriptions of scenes from the work. Also consult outside sources. Have other critics agreed with your opinion of this work? You may want to mention these reviews, too. Always make sure to cite other writers’ work correctly, if used.
The goal of a review is to evaluate or judge something. We judge things every day. For example, you have a favourite band or television show, and you like one supermarket more than you like another. These are judgements. When you write a review, your job is to state your opinion or judgement and support it. You do this by presenting reasons and evidence.

Review writing

Avoid vague words and phrases like “The service was bad” or “The pie was great.” Instead, provide specific details like, “The server was friendly but inexperienced and botched our drink order” or “The lemon meringue pie had a wonderfully flaky crust, a tart and tangy filling, and dreamy melt-in-your-mouth meringue.”

You can review basically anything if you find the right outlet for it, but the best way to present your thoughts depends on what you’re writing about and who your audience is. But with most types of reviews, there’s a simple structure you can stick to in order to help you get started:

Review writing
Having opinions is good. But you need to back them up with examples and evidence. For instance, in a restaurant review, it’s not enough to say that the food was “bad.” Your reader would want to know why it was bad. Were the ingredients fresh? Was it served cold? How was the overall experience? Did you raise the issue with staff at the restaurant?
My hot dog was, uhh, fuzzier than ideal.
(Photo: Zach Tirrell/flickr)

Review writing
Losing Joe’s Place is a great book for anyone who likes to see somebody else have a whole lot of funny, funny troubles. The story is hilarious and keeps you on the edge of your seat, and the characters are strange and interesting enough to make you want to know more about what will happen to them next. Out of four stars, I would give this book at least three and a half.
Another great thing about the book is the plot. Just as it seems that the boys are going to finally solve their problems and have a great summer, another problem arises that they have to solve, or else they will have to go back home to Owen Sound as the total failures that their parents expect: they run out of money more than once; they fight over the love of a girl they meet in Toronto, and they wind up becoming the secret restaurant kings of the city, all because of a chocolate memory. Whenever you think that things can’t get worse, they can, and the whole book builds toward the finish that you hoped couldn’t happen.

References:

http://www.lexico.com/grammar/top-tips-for-writing-a-review
http://www.grammarly.com/blog/how-to-write-review/
http://getproofed.com/writing-tips/5-tips-on-how-to-write-a-review/
http://www.saidsimple.com/content/100887/
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/review