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what should a review include

what should a review include

Current Opinion in Genetics & Development

  • Introduction
  • The body of the paper
  • Conclusion and future directions
  • Literature cited

An annotated bibliography is a list of your references with a summary of the content and the publication’s relationship to your research question. A literature review is an overview of the topic, an explanation of how publications differ from one another, and an examination of how each publication contributes to the discussion and understanding of the topic.
A literature review is a survey of scholarly sources that provides an overview of a particular topic. Literature reviews are a collection of the most relevant and significant publications regarding that topic in order to provide a comprehensive look at what has been said on the topic and by whom. The basic components of a literature review include:

  • define your topic and provide an appropriate context for reviewing the literature;
  • establish your reasons – i.e. point of view – for
  • reviewing the literature;
  • explain the organisation – i.e. sequence – of the review;
  • state the scope of the review – i.e. what is included and what isn’t included. For example, if you were reviewing the literature on obesity in children you might say something like: There are a large number of studies of obesity trends in the general population. However, since the focus of this research is on obesity in children, these will not be reviewed in detail and will only be referred to as appropriate.

A literature review should be structured like any other essay: it should have an introduction, a middle or main body, and a conclusion.

What should a review include

  1. Define your subject and the scope of the review.
  2. Search the library catalogue, subject specific databases and other search tools to find sources that are relevant to your topic.
  3. Read and evaluate the sources and to determine their suitability to the understanding of topic at hand (see the Evaluating sources section).
  4. Analyse, interpret and discuss the findings and conclusions of the sources you selected.

In assessing each source, consideration should be given to:

The first time you read or watch something, get an overall sense of the work. Then think about its strengths and weaknesses. Read or watch it again to confirm your first impressions. This time, take careful notes. Be ready to change your mind if a closer look sends you in a different direction.
Books, films, and television shows have beginnings, middles, and endings. People read and watch these works in part because they want to know what happens. Let them enjoy their stories. Provide a general idea of what happens, but don’t give away important secrets, especially the end.

References:

http://writingcenter.ashford.edu/writing-literature-review
http://www.rlf.org.uk/resources/the-structure-of-a-literature-review/
http://library.concordia.ca/help/writing/literature-review.php
http://www.lexico.com/grammar/top-tips-for-writing-a-review
http://www.dictionary.com/browse/review